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Valentine’s Day traditions from the world

In Europe the traditions of Valentine’s Day, or rather as we celebrate this romantic day we all know we spend the day with a loved one. You give chocolates, candlelight dinners, red roses and diamonds for those who can and so on and so forth. But how do they spend Valentine’s Day in other parts of the world? Here we go.

Valentine's Day around the world

Valentine’s Day around the world

Japan: On this day the real protagonists are women who, according to tradition, must give chocolates made by hand with their companions. These delicious treats can also be given to co-workers or classmates in token of friendship or gratitude. Tradition also has it that men have to return the gift received a month later, on March 14, also called “White Day”. In this case the chocolates will be exclusively white.

South Korea: The celebrations here are the same as those in Japan but on April 14, the day known as “Black Day” those who had not received anything on February 14th and March 14th will have to go to a restaurant, eat spaghetti with black sepia and sadly complain of their solitude.

Brazil: Valentine’s Day is not celebrated here on February 14 but Valentine’s Day is closer to our June 12, the eve of Saint Anthony is the patron of marriages. Tradition has it that unmarried women bring with them during the day a statue of the saint to whom they address their hopes of finding a husband as soon as possible.

United States: Where the festivities involve the whole family. In fact, on this day we celebrate the bonds of affection in their entirety. Particularly affected are children, preparing notes to be exchanged with peers and to give parents and teachers.

Slovenia. Here Valentine’s Day is delayed to March 12, the day of St. Gregory, as February 14 is the day when you start working in the fields.

Romania. The Valentine’s Day is called Dragobete and falls within 10 days later. In mythology Romanian Dragobete is the son of Baba Dochia, which represents the impatience of men waiting for the arrival of spring.

Photo: Maybii.

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